An Argentine Thanksgiving

November 24, 2011

It’s a beautiful 83-degree spring day.

I’m in Argentina.

And it’s Thanksgiving.

This whole seasonal shift thing is just so weird. It’s Thanksgiving. That means it’s supposed to be a bit chilly, maybe overcast, perhaps even a dusting of snow up at my mom’s house in the mountains of Southern California.

But it’s not chilly. It’s tremendously sunny, and this evening it’ll be a lovely 71 degrees.

Since no one down here talks about Thanksgiving, it snuck up on me. On Monday I realized the holiday was in a matter of days, so I started researching online to find out what other Americans do here in Buenos Aires for Turkey Day.

Argentina is not a country that eats turkey. Lots and lots and lots of beef, pork, some chicken, a little seafood, but no turkey. Also, I don’t have any American friends down here.  My friends are Argentinian or Australian or Scottish or British.

I didn’t want to hunt down and cook a turkey myself, so with a bit of googling I discovered that there are a few locales in Buenos Aires that have turkey dinners – Kansas Grill, which is like a Houston’s, and CasaBar in Recoleta. I figured it might be fun to meet up with some random expats and American travelers and bond over poultry and potatoes and Pinot (or, more likely, Malbec, but that doesn’t begin with a P).

However, I’ve only been out to eat a handful of times here – maybe four in my first 40 days – and I have yet to try the legendary Argentine Beef. I’ve really been wanting to go to La Cabrera, a restaurant which, I’ve been told by other expats, serves up some of the best beef around.

And then I started liking the idea – instead of celebrating my first Thanksgiving outside the US by finding something similar to what I’d be eating in the US, why not go Argentinian? My first expat Thanksgiving, my first Argentinian steak… sounds like a memorable combination, and a good story to tell when I’m old.

So tonight I plan to dine and give thanks at La Cabrera. With an Australian friend.

Before you go on to celebrate your Thanksgiving (or perhaps you’re already in a food-baby coma), watch this indescribably beautiful video about nature and life and gratitude; guaranteed to make you FEEL grateful for this beautiful life (and maybe bring a few tears to your eyes, give you goosebumps, make you want to go hiking, etc).

I hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving, full of love and gratitude and good friends and family and delicious and nourishing food!

Thank you for reading and sharing this journey with me; thank you for your comments and support; thank you for being a beautiful light in this world.

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4 Responses to “An Argentine Thanksgiving”

  1. misty said

    It was 76 degrees in LA today, not too big of a difference! 🙂
    We celebrated thanksgiving today instead of on thursday. I like being an adult and making up your own rules. That steak sounds delish! Miss you, love you, thankful for you!
    XOXOXO-Misty

    • lunasealife said

      I agree! Being an adult is fun, especially when you choose to enjoy yourself! 😉
      The major difference between here and LA is the double humidity… : / I dunno about this whole humidity thing. Might be good for all the fragrant plants here, but it just turns me into a sweaty mess.

      Miss you, love you, thankful for you too!!!!

  2. […] few days ago, my Thanksgiving wish came true and I celebrated my first expat Thanksgiving with my first Argentine steak at La […]

  3. […] abroad. Last year I was in Argentina, and had a big fat steak with an Australian friend (click here for the blog and here for photos of the […]

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